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20110701
20110731
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KQED (PBS) 28
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
: ...an extraordinary expansion of manhunt missions that have taken out thousands of al qaeda and taliban fighters. >> if you're trying to take down an insurgency, you take away its safe havens, you take away its leaders. >> hit the guy on the road. >> the joint special operations command is almost an industrial- scale counterterrorism killing machine. >> narrator: frontline investigates the latest us strategy... >> bludgeon your opponent. kill and capture as many as you can. make them ask for peace. >> narrator: ...its impact and its risks. >> by launching those attacks, are we creating more militants than in fact we are killing? >> narrator: can this campaign of killing and capturing make the difference? >> it could take years. i mean, i don't think anybody knows. >> bin laden's gone. that creates the kind of space in which diplomacy might actually be able to make progress. >> narrator: tonight on frontline , "kill/capture." >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding i
weapons -- the hopeful plea of the british prime minister to the taliban. is there any chance they will listen? a long march across africa for these somali refugees. they are driven to desperation. >> we have to scale up operations to meet the growing need. >> constantly connected -- is social media leaving all of us overwhelmed? welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. stop fighting, stop bombing, join the political process -- that is what british prime minister david cameron asked a taliban today. even as he spoke those words, four nato soldiers were killed in the eastern part of the country, which begs the question, what happens when foreign forces withdraw? the bbc reports. >> british troops in the helmand -- in helmand, dropping into an area the taliban previously controlled. the taliban wisely weren't there to meet them. so far, the british soldiers have not met any opposition. usually, the insurgency retreats, but not always. the villagers hope things will improve without the insurgents around. the taliban steal our food, he says. i am very po
>> this is "bbc world news america." the taliban continued to attack nato forces, but one u.s. senator tells us american troops must leave the country even sooner. a long march across africa for these somali refugees. the threat of drought and civil war has driven them to desperation. >> we can scale up our operation to meet the growing need. this crisis could turn into a catastrophe. >> and a royal welcome in one of canada's most remote regions. the duke and duchess of cambridge get a taste of the great outdoors. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and to our viewers across the globe. stop bombing, stop fighting, and joined the political process. that is what the british prime minister, david cameron, asked the taliban today. but even as he spoke those words on the second day of his visit to afghanistan, for nato's silk -- for nato soldiers were killed. which all begs -- which all begs the question, what happens when foreign forces withdraw? >> british troops drop in. it's an area the taliban used to control. no longer. nato is pushing out. that is what you can do w
with the taliban. the taliban is claiming responsibility for the assassination which has opened up a power vacuum. >> he describes himself as the most powerful men in southern afghanistan. few disagreed. ahmad wali karzai was a controversial figure. in kandahar today, the walls of sight of his compound were closed. the president's half brother lived under the tightest security. only the closest could get close. without saying a word, he shot him twice. he welcomed president sarkozy of france. he said, this morning, my younger brother was murdered -- martyred. this is the life of afghan people. we have all suffered the same kind of pain. forgive me for not speaking with a smile today. ahmad wali karzai was said to be deeply involved with the heroin trade. the allegations strained relations with afghanistan's allies. in april, he told a bbc documentary crew about attempts on his life. >> are there still now? >> every day. >> drug traffickers? >> taliban. >> ahmad wali karzai came close to being charged with corruption. according to a u.s. official, he was too valuable. here in kabul, the have lost
in dealing with the taliban. yet the taliban is claiming responsibility for the assassination, which has opened a power vacuum in the country. this is our report. >> ahmad wali karzai live behind layers of security. he had many enemies. today, his enemy was his end. assassins struck here at his home. a trusted assassin, a bodyguard. another bodyguard shot of a killer dead. it was too late, ahmad wali karzai died almost immediately and the news traveled fast. in kabul, president karzai announced his death. >> this morning, he said, my younger brother was murdered -- martyred in his house. this is the life of the afghan people. we have all suffered from the same pain. ahmad wali karzai was the most powerful player in kandahar. when we recently visited his compound, it was probably a day like today. he was the man to solve every problem. that created problems for him. >> this is for the big attacks, like suicide attacks. are two major suicide attacks on me -- on my office -- there were two major suicide attacks me -oe -- on my office. >> are they still happening? >> taliban pou >> he came u
to haunt them. u.s. and the taliban. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy, and improve schools. >> ...and our communities. >> in angola chevron helps train engineers, teachers and farmers, launch child's programs. >> it's not just good business. >> i'm hopeful about my country's future. >> it's my country's future. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: with little more than a week until the debt ceiling deadline, lawmakers on both sides of capitol hill offered competing plans today on how to avert a crisis. and late today,
compound. it's the third taliban attack on an afghan powerbroker in the south in more than two weeks. the new u.s. ambassador to afghanistan ryan crocker said it's proof the taliban is so damaged, it can't carry out large-scale operations. he spoke today in kabul. >> they've had to kind of regroup and figure out what they can do and, in some cases, that has been assassination. we saw a very similar pattern in iraq. clearly, these are horrific attacks but they can also be interpreted as a sign of significant organizational weakness. >> sreenivasan: a taliban spokesman told the associated press the kandahar mayor was targeted for ordering the destruction of homes city officials claimed were illegally constructed. two children were killed during that demolition. the prime minister of norway today announced an independent commission will review how last week's twin attacks were allowed to happen. and more details emerged about the self-confessed killer, who is in police custody. we have a report from carl dinnen of "independent television news." >> reporter: by the side of the lake, a sh
in afghanistan. they also have the pakistani taliban attacking them. we're also the point of a new low in u.s.-pakistani relations. so the idea that pakistan would instigate a crisis with india at this point is inconceivable to me. >> what about indian intelligence-gathering and a security? there have been a number of threats, particularly since 2008. is this any reflection on the indian authorities competence in this area? >> there will be questioned about another attack in mumbai. again, four attacks in the last 10 years. after 2008, there were major reviews within india about internal security, and in this case, there will be a very close examination of how quickly india responded. they have their national security guard deployed there. they have friends a unit on the scene. they need to hopefully -- they have forensic units on the scene. they need to hopefully see having that experience corrected in that beleaguered city. >> in other news, police and venezuela have regained control of a prison east of the capital after a standoff that lasted for 27 days. more than 800 inmates have not g
of the afghan people, we have all suffered from the same kind of pain. >> the taliban claimed responsibility for the assassination, afghan officials said an internal feud was also a possibility. and police launched an investigation. the murder also created an incident and ominous leadership vacuum in southern afghanistan at a time when u.s. troops are to begin withdrawing. ahmed wali karzai was a powerful and controversial figure in the family's an cessual home province of kandahar and was a key power broker and proxy for his brother in the region. but he was also widely suspected of a deep and pervasive corruption. in an interview last month with the cbc, the canadian broadcasting corporation, karzai dismissed persistent talk of profiteering. >> it is never approved. i might help people to facilitate things for them when it comes to security, when it comes to organizing meeting with the population. because i'm the only person who has all the facilities. >> for years, allegations also swirled that the one-time chicago-area restauranteur had ties who afghanistan's lucrative drug trade. but ka
is far from over. >> in other news around the world taliban militants carried out a major attack in southern afghanistan using suicide bombers, rocket propelled grenades and machine guns. the sustained assault targeted the offices of the deputy govern and a private security firm. the trial of desupposed president will start next week in cairo. he faces charges of corruption and ordering the killers of protectors. doctors said he was weak and refusing solid food. the maid who accused the head of the former i.m.f. of trying to rape her claim they have been left traumatized by the accusation. her lawyer says they may launch a civil suit. in china the government is facing a public backlash over the way it handled a high speed train crash that killed 39 people. authorities say the trash was caused by design flaws but allegations of corruption and lack of transparency are fueling public anger. the premiere has visited the crash site. >> this is the soft paternal face of the communist party. in times of a crisis like this one the premiere is called upon to soothe the nation's nerves. he
. -- kandahar. a spokesman for the taliban says they carried out the attack. back here in washington, the countdown continues with just six days left before the country must lift its debt ceiling or risk of fraud. but despite the nearing deadline and threats that the country's credit rating could be in jeopardy, the political wrangling continues. for more on where things stand, i spoke to democratic senator barbara boxer from capitol hill just a short time ago. senator, thank you very much for joining us. two plans on their way through the house or the senate. can either of them actually pass congress? >> well, i think the harry reid plan is a compromise that everybody has been calling for and everybody wants. it gives the republicans what they want which is no revenues and cuts, and it helps the democrats because we are not cutting medicare. we are not cutting social security. so it is really a compromise, and it gets us out of this chaotic mess we are in it because we cut enough spending to take us all of the way to last us to the election, so it sends a column in message to the ma
. they are alleged to have links to al qaeda and the taliban in neighboring afghanistan. security forces claim success. but alongside these operations have been many arrests of people on the flimsiest of grounds. so the people of this traditional muslim country could be pushed into the arms of radical groups by the government's own heavy-handed tactics, and the continued poverty and corruption that blights their lives. bbc news. >> it was billed as an awesome deal. two of the online world biggest names announced they were teaming up a. facebook is announcing a chat service that will be provided by skype, which is being bought by microsoft. for more, i am joined from san francisco by the editor at large of cnet. remember you are speaking to a technical neophyte. what does this mean you will be able to do that you could not before? >> if you are looking at a list of your friends on facebook, which is the court to what facebook is all about, there is a simple click to have a video chat with them, a video call, using the skype software you use to have to leave facebook to use. now you can do a cha
against other militant groups which are armed and are alleged to have links to al qaeda and the taliban in afghanistan. the security forces claim success. alongside these operations have been many arrests of people on the flimsiest of grounds. so, the people of this traditional muslim country could be pushed into the arms of radical groups by the government's own heavy-handed tactics. and by the continuing policy of corruption with lights their lives. -- blights their lives. >> it was billed as an automobile -- as an awesome deal. facebook is launching a video chat service which will be provided by skype. for more on what this means for the industry, i spoke earlier from san francisco with the editor at large with c-net. what does this mean that you will be able to do on facebook that you could not do before? >> pretty simply it means that if you looking at a vista of your friends on facebook, there is now a simple click to have a video chat with them using the skype software that you used to have to leave facebook to use. now, you can do a skype video chat or call without leaving faceb
was killed. the taliban said they carried out the attack. in somalia, an operation to airlift supplies into the capital mogadishu is underway, the first of 10 missions being carried out by the world food program in response to the severe drought which is ravaging the horn of africa. our correspondent reports. >> the carter, 10 tons of food for a severely nourished children in somalia -- the cargo. the therapeutic paste is a lifesaver. it is a race against time. >> within the next few days, i believe some of this will be going to mogadishu, where it will be distributed at feeding centers too malnourished children there. >> the world food program says the first airlift will feed 350,000 children over the next month, but given the scale in somalia, this is just a drop in the ocean -- will feed 3500. aid agencies say that with so many children in a precarious situation, there is a danger disease could break out. in somalia, almost half the population urgently needs of food aid. rations have been cut in recent months. now, there is a massive drive to increase the assistance. some say the u.
taliban attack. we are at the point of a new low. the idea that pakistan would instigate a crisis with india at this point is inconceivable. >> what about indian intelligence gathering and security? there has been a number of cracks, particularly since 2008. is this any reflection on the indian authority's confidence? >> there will be questions about another attack in mumbai. after 2008, there were major reviews within india within -- about internal security. in this case, there would be a very close examination of how close that india has responded. they have their guard deployed there, they have forensic units on the scene. they need to hopefully see that experience was directing a quick response to what is taking place now in the beleaguered city. >> ambassador, thank you for joining us. >> the afghan president has left thousands of mourners at the funeral of his brother. he wept openly during the ceremony and climbed into the grave to kiss his brothers forehead. his brother was one of the most powerful figures in the south and he was shot dead by his own head of security. more
. in this case, the mission was to take the taliban out of power in afghanistan, to destroy al qaeda training camps, and to find those responsible for 9/11. the nation-building mission turned out to be very problematic. we need to pull the plug on that experiment and redeploy our forces and redeploy our resources. tavis: this is the all hell will break out if we pull out completely. what is your response? >> let me explain a little bit further. there are those who talk about staying to build an effective police. but literacy is very low. the police numbers are completely added. there is an enormous amount of carson. the police in afghanistan are fugs. we eatow they are -- we them and train them and now we have a trained and equipped thugs. you think via administration has decided we still need to be there? >> the administration uses some of the language in saying that we need to change your direction. he is doing so in a very slow pace that keeps us in this nation-building capacity. i think it is very hard to reverse course. that has proven itself time overtime as our nation becomes involved
secured the area. among the dead, an influential cleric. a man opposed to the taliban. like so many other tax, the brunt of it was borne by ordinary afghans. more people are also dying from nato air strikes. late on wednesday, six villages were attacked among the victims, women and children. it led to a wave of anger. protests have taken place pressing for the withdrawal of western forces. that is about to happen imminently. some are wondering, at what cost? starting next week and over the next several months, thousands of nato troops have begun to a withdrawal. handing over security to local afghan forces. questions are being raised about whether there are taking on the role especially after these high-profile killings. >> now, austerity is a word and a condition many europeans have been forced to adopt all though it is sparking massive protests across the continent. italy's senate passed its own cost-cutting package coming after investors started to worry that the eurozone could be the largest economy to be sucked into the debt crisis. our europe panter reports. italy has been told that
. taliban militants have carried out a major attack in southern afghanistan, killing more than 20 people, including a bbc reporter. the assault targeted the officers of the deputy governor, police headquarters and a private security firm. a u.s. soldier has been arrested near the fort hood military base in texas after being found with bomb-making materials. the serviceman has admitted planning an attack. in china, the government is facing a public backlash over the way it handled a high speed train crash which killed 39. authorities say the crash was called by design flaws and signaling equipment but allegations of corruption and lack of transparency are fueling public anger. the premier has visited the crash site. the bbc's martin patience reports from the scene. >> wen jiabo is the soft paternal face of the communist party. in times like this he's called upon to soothe the nation's nerves. at the crash site he paid his respects but he was also bowing to public pressure. >> no matter if it's a mechanical fault, a management problem, or indeed a manufacturing issue, we will get to the bo
, the taliban come back will there be a historical judgment that because of whatever reading of history he made that he will be considered the president that lost afgnistan? >> that's a really good question because the last chapter of the book, chapter 10, is called "good enough." and what they're hoping for is something they can term "good enough." that it will not be termed a loss. that it may not be a full-fledged victory. it m not be something that they can proclaim that everhing is wonrful in afghanistan w. but something they can say is good enough. they can get out at whatever point they do that, not having to say they lost. so that is definite play the people that talked to said that they'r hoping for and that's the last chapter of the book. >> rose: someone who had a personal experience with vietnam never wanted to put boots on the ground. >> never. he would do anything... he'd be a great hero bombing from 30,000 feet but don't put boots on the ground. that was his fundamental problem at that time. >> rose: well, and that's also the point of view of barack obama about libya, for exampl
. the taliban claimed responsibility for it all. ten children were among the dead, and so was a bbc journalist. it is the latest uptick in violence in the south following the killing of afghan president hamid karzai's half-brother on july 12. a twin bombing at a bank in northern iraq today killed a dozen people. a suicide bomber and car blast rocked the city of tikrit, as iraqi policemen and security forces were picking up their paychecks. thick smoke could be seen billowing from the scene of the explosions. more than 30 people were wounded. it's the fourth major attack on the city so far this year. the head of the rebel armed forces in libya and two of his aides were killed today. the head of the national transitional council announced the deaths and said abdel fattah younis was killed by gunmen while on his way to questioning over a military matter. younnis was moammar qaddafi's interior minister before defecting early in the libyan uprising. there was heavy fighting in somalia's capital today, with a half dozen people killed. the african union launched a new operation to protect famine reli
to al-qaeda and the taliban. a leader of that network was killed in a nato air strike last night. defense secretary robert gates got a ceremonial send-off his last day on the job. president obama and the outgoing joint chiefs chairman admiral mike mullen joined hundreds of others on the parade ground outside the pentagon, to mark the occasion. the president awarded gates the medal of freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor. and the secretary joked it had been a secret to rival the raid on osama bin laden. >> i'm deeply honored and moved by your presentation of this award. it is a big surprise, but we should have known a couple of months ago, you're getting pretty good at this covert ops stuff. ( laughter ) >> sreenivasan: gates served four and a half years as defense secretary, starting under president bush. he will be replaced by leon panetta, who moves over from his post as c.i.a. director. panetta's successor at the c.i.a. general david petraeus won senate confirmation today. in lebanon, a u.n.-backed tribunal issued indictments today in the assassination of former prime
taliban insurgents claimed another high- profile assassination. a close aide to afghan president hamid karzai was killed sunday in a gunbattle at his home in kabul. it followed the murder of karzai's half-brother last week. for more on afghanistan we turn to pam constable, who covers south asia for the "washington post." pam, thanks for being with us. the series of high profile assassinations have picca off important targets as well. one of the former governors of a province. why is it significant? >> well, particularly in light of the fact that it came so quickly after the assassination of the half brother of president karzai who was killed in kandahar just days before this, the killing of this former governor in another southern province along with another guy who was also close to the president, this is cumulatively speaking, it's a big blow for the karzai administration. you know, it'sçç confidant, relatives, high-level aides going back into april some of them are being killed. but more than who is doing it or who it's happening to, i would put it altogether by saying it's a re
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)